How to use Scrapebox for Link Building not Spamming

Scrapebox is well known in the SEO community as a Grey Hat, Black Hat, Yellow Polka Dotted Hat link building tool that is mainly used by blog commenting spammers. If you have ever spent any time reading blogs you will have seen the stereotypical comments on blogs. They usually say things such as “Great Blog Post thanks for sharing” with a keyword rich anchor text link to a site selling fake Ugg boots.

I know a lot of my regular readers will have a heart attack at the recommendation of using Scrapebox as a “White Hat” Link Building tool. A lot of people in the SEO community hate the thoughts of automated link building and the sheer mention of a tool such as Scrapebox makes their skin crawl. I can already imagine several people ready to jump down to the comments and tell me that tools like this are ruining the internet…

Well “Soapbox White Hatters” I’m going to show you a way that you can actually use Scrapebox to make the internet a better place… in fact a safer place for all!

So what is this Scrapebox Link building technique?

This link building technique utilises some of the free plugins that you can get from Scrapebox, the main tactic in this technique is to find a compromised or malware infected site and open a dialogue with the site owner in an attempt to receive a link either via a Guest Post or by suggesting the site owner replaces broken links with your own.

Scrapebox currently costs $97 (there are a few coupons on the net for $57 if you search around) and for the amount of time and money this tool will save you it is more than worth the investment. Scrapebox allows you to harvest thousands of URL’s from Google and Bing in no time at all and by entering your own custom footprints e.g. “submit * guest post” [keyword] you will find lots of guest blogging opportunities for your niche quickly. You can also import .txt files with lots of different search terms to put your harvesting on steroids.

The first free plugin you will need is the Malware and Phishing Filter once you have installed this plugin it allows you to search a list of sites from Scrapebox to find sites that have been compromised by some form of Malware. If you have Google Webmaster Tools setup on your websites then Google will normally inform you that a site has been infected by malware. Sadly many bloggers and small business owners rarely check their sites for malware and not everyone knows how to setup Google Webmaster tools.

Import your list of scraped URLs into the Malware checker and run it. This will flag up any site that has been compromised by some form of malware. You now want to export all of these bad urls and using the OSE check for PA/DA of the pages. Starting with the sites with the highest authority I then work down my list.

You can run the list through the Scrapebox Whois tool or use Scrapebox itself to check the contact page for any email addresses. You do not want to visit these sites as there is a risk that your computer maybe infected by a virus.

Now you want to send an email to the webmaster informing them of the malware issue on their site and send them a link to some helpful blog posts on how to fix malware infected sites. (If you haven’t checked out John Doherty’s blog post on SEOMoz about outreach email then make sure you do!)

You obviously do not want to ask for a link at this point. Depending on the quality of the site it might be worth using your hustle to track down alternative contact details too such as phone number, Twitter Handle, LinkedIn profile etc.

I have had a very good success rate in contacting webmasters using this technique and quite often I find that they are very grateful for you pointing out the problem on their website. Now that you have the dialogue with the site owner I will leave it to your imagination as to what approach you use next to obtain the link. But, this a good time to check the site for broken links or pitch a guest blog as the webmaster will probably have to recover the content on the site. I have even had a few webmasters offer me the chance to buy their sites for a small fee as they don’t have the time or inclination to fix their site and keep it up to date anymore!

So there you have it one way in which you can use a well regarded spam tool to speed up your link building research and to help make the web a safer place.

More Scrapebox Goodies.

I’m going to cover off a couple of other tasks I like to use ScrapeBox for when I am carrying out my day to day role, and hopefully I can show you some great ways to save time and speed up those monotonous processes.  There are a lot of extra applications for ScrapeBox and I am going to leave it to your own judgement as to the “ethical” use of this tool.

How to find Blogs to Guest Post on using ScrapeBox

I know guest blogging has been getting a lot of stick recently and quite rightly so. Some link builders have been really abusing this great tactic over the past few months; but I am sure you won’t be doing that will you now.

In this guide I am going to run through some screenshots so you can see how easy it is to use. I hope you are pretty up to speed with your advanced Google search operators, because you’re going to be dusting them off once you get your hands on ScrapeBox.

In this guide I am suggesting ways to find guest post prospects but you could just as easily use this method to find blogs to place infographics, videos or whatever other outreach projects you are working on.

  1. You want to add in your main keyword in this case I am looking for SEO blogs to write for
  2. You select “Custom Footprint” and add in your different footprints
  3. Select the search engine(s) you want to scrape e.g. Bing, Google, Yahoo
  4. Click the “start harvesting” button and go grab a fresh cup of coffee
  5. Once you have finished harvesting your URL’s you want to remove the duplicates (and you can also use ScrapeBox to lookup the PageRank of the domain)
  6. You then want to export the list into a CSV file
  7. I then like to do some basic prospecting to qualify my targets e.g. Web Design, PageRank or mozRank, RSS Subscribers, Social Media presence

I am not going to cover off best practises on pitching your guest posts in this article but if you want some good pointers on outreach I suggest you read my blogger outreach interview.

How to use ScrapeBox to Check for Broken Links

Another ScrapeBox tool you will find quite handy is the bulk URL check, especially if you have a big list of URL’s to check on a regular basis.

Oh and did I mention, you don’t even need to buy a license for this tool it’s completely free!

All you have to do is open the tool and then import a list of links you want to check in one text file. Now upload another text file you want to add in your URL’s. There are two options here you can either check a link to a specific URL is live or just check a link to the domain is live. It only takes a few minutes to check your list and then you can export the failed links and check with the webmaster to see why it may have been removed.

How to use ScrapeBox to Scrape Google Image Search

Do you suffer from your images being stolen by webmasters without attribution?  Well you can use Scrapebox to search Google for your image and then return the URL’s. The best way to do this is to make sure your image file names contain a set of random letters and numbers that will make it easy for you to find them e.g. dog-photo-xc345.jpg

You can then do a quick Google image search with ScrapeBox for “dog-photo-xc345.jpg” and the URL’s will be revealed. I would then personally load this list into ScrapeBox and use the WHOIS lookup tool to find the contact information for the domain owner and reach out asking they provide a link to your site for fair use of your image.

“Haters gonna hate… Scrapers gonna Scrape…”

As I mentioned at the start of this post there are lots of other great uses for ScrapeBox such as this article on ScrapeBox Keyword Research and also some additional ScrapeBox Tricks and Tips by Dan Bochichio.

If you have any more Scrapebox tips and tricks drop them in the comments below.

Use Content Curation to Drive More Traffic

For the last couple of weeks I have been using a content curation service called Scoop.it to generate lots of referral traffic to my blog posts and I’ve decided to share what I have learned so far and also show how content curation can help you to grow your social network too.

What is Content Curation?

If you have a good understanding of the new social web landscape then there is no doubt that the term “content is king” comes up again and again. Content is the currency of the internet and by sharing your own great content and other people’s great content you will grow your social network and be held in high regard by your followers as the go to source or expert in your field.

By following all the latest news sources in your niche you can soon find yourself overrun with numerous RSS Feeds, Tweets, Google+ updates and Facebook shares flashing  before your eyes every day. This is where content curation comes in; quite simply content curation is the process of filtering out the best content that you find and then sharing this with your networks.

What is Scoop.it?

Scoop.it is a content curation service, but rather than have me rattle on about it you can watch this brief video below.

Scoop.it has the latest news delivered to you and allows you to re-share it with your social network. Another great aspect of Scoop.it is that other people can suggest for content to be added to your pages too. Scoop.it have a free entry profile which allows you to setup 5 pages and get used to the interface, if you want to curate information in more niches or have analytical data then you need to upgrade to a paid membership.

How to Use Scoop.it

The key to being a great content curator is by picking a niche in which to share your information and vigilantly sticking to it. The narrower the niche you decide to curate content in, the better. If you decide to setup a Scoop.it page about knitting patterns the majority of your regular followers are unlikely to be interested in your curated content on pictures of kittens.

First things first, go to Scoop.it and sign up with either your Twitter or Facebook Profile.

You will then see a screen similar to this one where you fill in the name, description and keywords for your new page.

Pro Tip: Use Google’s Keyword Tool to find keywords that people looking for your content may use. If you want to learn more you can read my blog post on using the Google Keyword Tool.

Now that your page is created you want to setup your news sources. Simply enter your keywords into the search box, these keywords will be checked regularly in Google, Digg and Youtube for the latest content in your niche. Next you want to click on Advanced Options. This is where knowing your niche comes into its own:

As you can see from the above image you can add in various personalised news sources such as RSS Feeds, Twitter accounts and lists, Google News Search, Google Blog Search and OPML files from Google Reader. You want to add all the best curators and thought leaders in your Niche to this list & the best blog feeds too.

Protip: Use a blog curator such as AllTop to grab your feed and setup a Twitter List of interesting people you can add to easily so you don’t have to keep adding them to your Scoop.it sources.

Now you are ready to start your new career as a content curator. After about an hour Scoop.it will have scraped your RSS feeds, Twitter Followers and searched Google for new content based on your keywords. Simply clicking Scoop.it will scoop the news to your page, from here you can share it with your Twitter and Facebook accounts, add tags to make the Scoop easier to find and change the text or images. If you don’t like a suggested article simply click discard and the page is removed.

Pro Tip: Install the Scoop.it App (its free) and add the Scoop.it bookmarklet to make it easier to Scoop content on the fly.

If you see a piece of content on another Scooper’s page you can “rescoop” it by clicking the arrows that look like a refresh button. It is also common etiquette to thank (thumbs up) your fellow content curator when you rescoop their find.

Generating Traffic to your Site with Scoop.it

Well there are two ways to get traffic from Scoop.it, the first is obviously to add your own blog posts & photos to your page. This will have limited results, just like running any web site, until you grow your following. Building a following takes time and may require weeks of curating and sharing great content, following other people on Scoop.it and commenting on other peoples Scoops. If you are anything like me this looks a lot like hard work, but by doing this I have noticed I am sharing lots more content with my Twitter followers and growing my followers.

So the second and quicker way, and I’m sure all the link builders have spotted this already, is to suggest your content to other users.

There are people on Scoop.it who already receive hundreds and hundreds of views per day to their pages and in one of the examples above they have had over 130k views in less than a few months. So by suggesting your own content to their page you have a chance that your post will be accepted and a good percentage of their fellow Scoopers will come flooding to your site and re-scoop your page to their followers and other social networks too.

To start you need to find who the influencers are in your niche. This is easy to do by searching for your keyword in the search bar at the top or by browsing the topics based on popularity and current trends.

You can then quickly research the curator as their profiles often contain links to their other social profiles e.g. Twitter or Facebook.

From the this example you can clearly see links to this Scoop.it users Linked.in, Twitter and Facebook Accounts.

As any experienced linkbuilder will tell you its important to build a relationship with a Social Media Influencer first rather than just bombard them with requests out of the blue. By engaging with them on other social networks and where possible find their website and contact information you can then begin to approach them with suggestions for their Scoop.it accounts.

My favourite tool at the moment to research potential link targets is Follower Wonk. It is a great way to learn more about who your influencer influences. It will also help you discover if they have any “Thought leaders” within their network, so you can gauge whether or not your suggested content will go Viral if it is shared by them too.

My last blog post on Automating Google+ with your other Social Media Accounts was curated on a very popular Google+ Scoop.it page. Over the next 48 hours I received about two hundred visitors from this page and two other pages that re-scooped my blog post. I also received a 10% increase in traffic from Twitter and Facebook than normal during this period too.

But, isn’t Content Curation Bad for my SEO?

In a post Panda World I can understand why people might worry about “duplicated content” but the thing about content curation services such as Scoop.it is that you never republish the whole web page. The web page is also linked back to from Scoop.it providing confirmation of the contents origins and although most of links on Scoop.it are no-followed, to prevent spamming, a link is still a link.

Many businesses forget that SEO is not just about links or chasing the number one spot in the SERP’s but by growing and diversifying the traffic to your website. By having diverse traffic sources you will be able to continue to grow your business online for a long time to come no matter what happens with the next big “algo” change.

If you have had any positive or negative experiences with curation services such as Scoop.it please leave a comment below.

Link Building – Competitor Analysis Case Study

As a webmaster Link Building seems like a very daunting task; with so much misinformation, poor advice and varied personal opinions on the web it’s not hard to see why most people can be confused as to where to start – the most common questions I get asked by clients and friends are:

  • What are the best types of links to build?
  • How many links do I need to get to the first page of Google?
  • Should I use the same keyword anchor text or mix it up with brand terms?

Well all of that is relative…

Invariably my answer starts by asking them more about their competition. Competitor analysis is a very important part of the link building puzzle. By understanding what your competition are doing to hold on to those all important and much sought after search engine results then you too can learn more about the types of links you need, what type of anchor text and generally the volumes of links you might need to rank well.

With so many tools available in the market place and the large amounts of data that can be produced by them it has never been easier to snoop on your competitors. In this post I am going to carry out a competitor analysis for Cash Cow UK, a free to use internet auction site, so you can understand a little more about the processes I use to analyse the link profiles of my clients competitors.

Using the free to use Google Keyword Tool I normally find 50-100 keyword phrases that my client wants to rank well for to get more traffic to their site. I then run a quick Google search to find out who the top 5 ranking pages for those keywords are and make a note of them. (There are some more advanced automated techniques that I use to do this but for now I want to keep it simple)

For the purpose of this case study I am going to just focus on 3 key word phrases:

Online Auction – 60,500 UK Searches per month

Online Car Auction – 8,500 UK Searches per month

Free Online Auction – 1,300 UK Searches per month

Intuitively you would think that eBay would be top for at least 2 of these search terms however they only appear once in these SERP’s and in position 2, this is very common to find when you ask a client to tell you more about their market as they often over state and under state their competition’s online presence.

I have decided to look a little more at the back link profiles of uk.madbid.com, ebay.co.uk, uk.ebid.net and totalbids.co.uk in order to find some quality link opportunities. The two tools I would recommend are SEO Spyglass it’s free to trial and less than $100 for a license or you could try the SEOMoz pro tools again it is free to trial but its $99 a month thereafter, however it provides lots of great data, including Social data and tonnes of great reports.

Below is the output from SEOMoz’s Link Metrics Comparison tool, as you can see there are lots of external links pointing to eBay and ebid however Total Bids who we saw were ranking very highly for Free Online Auction only have 200 external links. So I will probably start here to understand this better.

What we are interested in here is the Domain Authority (DA) and Page Authority (PA), this is a value calculated by SEOMoz based on the quality of links that are pointing at the page.  SEO Spyglass does not have DA and PA but it does give you the Google Page Rank of the linking page and linking root domain which can also be useful to determine good quality links.

Go to Open Site Explorer and input the page you want to analyse; in this case I have input www.totalbids.co.uk

As you can see this page has over 1100 links from over 100 different domains, it has received only 7 Facebook shares and 1 tweet. This looks like quite an easy link profile to investigate to find some great links.

Firstly we want to look at the Anchor Text, this is very easy to do in both OSE and SEO Spyglass:

As you can see a lot of their anchor text is just their brand name there are very few links containing the keyword that they rank well for. I would say over 50% of their links don’t have any mention of Online Auction or Free Online Auction. This means that we are working in a niche where quality counts.

You now want to export the links report into Microsoft Excel by using the Download to CSV function. I normally only export the domains and followed links so that I can see what type of site they are and to determine how easy or difficult it will be to obtain the link. I normally don’t export no follow links as these are often just blog comments and have very little link value.

Now you want to do the same for all of the link profiles of the other competitors and add them to your list. You should now have a master list of several hundred if not thousands of domains to target.

I normally then sort the lists of domains by DA or Page rank and categorise them as one of the following:

  • Info Site – low quality information site
  • Education or Government Site – hard to find links
  • News Site – quality newspaper or news site e.g. Mashable
  • Article/Press Release
  • Blog –possible Guest Blogging opportunity or product review
  • Web Directory – easy to obtain by submitting a link

Then in the same spreadsheet I then put a few notes and actions I have taken e.g. when I sent an email to the webmaster, contact details of the blogger etc.

Advanced Tip: If any of the blogs have a Twitter Account, be sure to make a note of it and write down the number of followers they have and their Klout Score. This will help you determine whether they are a key influencer in their niche and how much effort you should put into getting a link on their site. You can easily find someone’s Klout score by visiting www.klout.com/(username) where (username) is their Twitter username.

Now that you have your list of sites to approach for a link you need to decide what your approach will be. How much time will you spend chasing that elusive link and what can you do to get it.

I normally approach link building with the easy links first I list the site on all the directory sites that I have found and if they are paid directories I will sum up whether or not the quality of the site is worth paying for the link to be added or not. I usually do this by looking at the DA and PA of the pages my link would appear on and whether it would be just as easy to get a free link from another source.

As for the article and press release directories I will submit a few pieces of content to these if they have a good DA but I really don’t value these types of links and I believe the Search Engines have devalued these types of links over time too. However SEO is not just about getting links it’s about getting traffic and brand recognition too so a few press releases/articles now and again never hurt.

If it is a lower value blog or site that I want to target for a back link then I may simply send them a nice email asking for a link adding to their article, in this case their list of eBay alternatives. With this link analysis I also discovered a number of Blogspot, WordPress, Squidoo and other web 2.0 properties. I would consider making some web 2.0 properties myself if I couldn’t persuade the owner to give me a link. For the higher quality news sites and blogs then I will spend time getting to know the blogger or webmaster in order to get a guest post, share an infographic I have created or perhaps get them to review my client’s product. This is where you want to target your most efforts, a link from a few high profile web sites can catapult your site in to the big time so this is where you want to be creative and invest your time.

I hope you found this guide useful and hopefully it’s given you some insight into how easy link building can be by researching your competition.

+Chris Dyson

My Comprehensive Guide to Guest Blogging

I often receive emails and tweets from my followers on Twitter who ask me what is the best way to get backlinks to their sites. All too often I see people recommending blackhat or ineffective link building techniques that will often see little return on the time or money invested by the individual concerned. So this brings us to guest blogging or guest posting, it is a great form of link building because it’s organic, it also gives exposure to you and your brand. I can’t recommend guest blogging as a scalable and long lasting link building technique enough.

So in order to help people find out more about Guest blogging I have taken the time to write this guide to guest blogging so that hopefully I can quell a few myths and help make the internet a better place with fewer spammy articles and more quality content.

So what is Guest Blogging?

Guest blogging is the process of you writing for another website as a guest author – it is that simple.

It is very important to know that guest blogging isn’t only for promoting a blog but it can also be used to promote your website and business. You can get a professional copy writer to help write the content for you but to be honest it’s much better to write the article yourself so that you can put across a bit of your personality and possibly explain your industry knowledge a little better.

Why Should I Guest Blog?

Quite simply I always answer with the same 4 things to businesses. Business owners want to see figures attributed to any investment so I always quote the following which can be measured quantitatively:

  • Web Traffic – Let’s be honest the most important factor in running a website is traffic. You can be top of the SERP’s for lots of keywords but if those keywords aren’t bringing people to your site then what’s the point in them! Guest blogging allows you to get in front of a new audience and often on very busy websites and some of these people will read your article and come to your blog/site to learn more about you.
  • More Customers – It is very important that once you get a person on to your website you convert them into a customer or a prospect whether that means they buy your product/service, join your mailing list or simply just subscribe to your RSS feed.
  • High Quality Links – If you want your blog or website to get good rankings in the search engine results pages, then you need backlinks. Guest blogging is one of the simplest and most legitimate ways to get your keyword rich anchor text links to your website from high authority sites. I am yet to come across a simpler and more effective white hat method for getting good rankings.
  • Exposure – As any business owner knows it is all about getting your business or brand name out in to the world. Building a good reputation in your field will help you achieve so much more. Opportunities may well arise for you to speak at business conferences to share your knowledge with other people in your community.

Guest Blogging offers a real win-win-win opportunity for all involved – the reader gets some great content from a new perspective, the blogger gets a day off as well as some content to enrich their own work and you get access to an audience as well as a good quality link.

The benefits of Guest Blogging vs. Article Marketing

One thing I have noticed is that many people compare guest blogging to article marketing, this is such a great misconception. I have yet to see an article directory that has sent over 1,000 visitors to a website in 24 hours.

Many article directories have been downgraded following the Google Panda update and with good reason too as many had become a haven for dodgy SEO practitioners who spun content until it was unreadable. Article directories are not designed for people and offer very little SEO value.

Guest Blogging Strategies

Guest blogging has principles and one of the principles of guest blogging is that you must set goals before getting started. Don’t burn yourself out writing lots of articles for too many sites, so make sure you stick to your goals to get the most “bang for your buck”. This is why you need to also think more strategically.

I see guest blogging opportunities as 2 key tiers:

  1. Contributing to high-quality; high-authority sites
  2. Contributing to good quality, less authoritative niche sites

If a guest bloging opportunity does not fit in to the top 2 types then I don’t bother with it, after all we are looking for decent links that will provide our sites with traffic and good rankings. I don’t write articles for lower quality sites simply because a) they are more likely to disappear and b) blog posts become more and more hidden over time so if the blog I am contributing to does eventually hit the big time my article will be under layers and layers of pages and have very little link juice.

Write your post first – I always recommend writing the article first before pitching your ideas to the blog owner. There is nothing worse than pitching an idea, agreeing a deadline and then struggling to hit it.

Respond to Comments – Because guest blogging is about writing on relevant websites, it’s important to stay professional and friendly with the influencers in your niche that you interact with. Not only should you try to keep in email contact with the blogger you’re writing for, but respond to as many comments as you can once your guest post goes live. This will show the blogger (and their site readers) that you genuinely want to give people genuine advice on whatever it is you write about.

Don’t forget about your blog! – After all let’s not forget that once you have had lots of new visitors to your website you need to keep them coming back. So make sure that you write some great articles in advance of any guest blogging campaign so that any new RSS / email subscribers will stick with you.

How To Find Guest Blog Opportunities

There are lots of great ways to find guest blogging opportunities and I recommend that you start out by reaching out to your business contacts, friends and social networks to see if they would be prepared to let you write an article on their site. But as I said above it is important to find websites with lots of traffic and good authority so I recommend the below techniques too:

Google Search – Here are some Google search tips that will let you find valuable guest posting opportunities in your niche.

Firstly do a search online for Guest blogging opportunities. Here’s more or less complete list of phrases bloggers use to invite people to guest post:

  • “Submit a guest post” / “Submit post” / “Submit blog post”
  • “Add blog post”
  • “Submit an article”
  • “Suggest a guest post”
  • “Send a guest post”
  • “Write for us”;
  • “Become an author”;
  • “Guest bloggers wanted”
  • “Contribute to our site”;
  • “Become a contributor”;
  • “Become guest writer”
  • “(Write for our) guest column”.

Now, you may have noticed that all the phases are used in the quotation marks – this is to force Google to search for the exact match because otherwise you will get too general results randomly mentioning “post”, “contribute” and “guest”.

For example type into Google:  “Submit an article” credit cards

Now if you are a little more Google search savvy you can try some more advanced search strings.

More often than not it is hard to describe your blog topic with just one keyword. For example, your blog may be about money, credit cards, loans, finance etc. The more words you use, the lesser results you will get, because Google will do its best to show you only those pages that have all of those words listed.

To get broader but relevant results, we should instruct Google to search for any of the words – for that we can use OR operator between the words: “money OR loans OR finance OR credit cards” because, essentially we are interested in guest blogging on sites covering any of these topics.

To go even further in this direction, we can use ~ operator before a word that may have many synonyms and related words and thus instruct Google to look for all those synonyms. For example, “~money” search will include words like “currency”, “finance”, “financial”, etc. Also there is the wild card operator “*” as many bloggers may use a phrase differently e.g  “submit a guest post”, “submit your guest post”, “submit us a guest post”.

So if we were to combine all the above tips you would get

“submit * guest post” ~Money OR Credit Cards OR Loans

Guest Blogging Community –  There are various blogging communities out there. MyBlogGuest is my personal favourite guest blogging community as it has a wide variety of niche blogging opportunities and a very healthy number of members. Simply visit their forum and post that you are looking for guest blogging opportunities in your niche.

Technorati  – A great way to find the top blogs in your niche is by making use of the technorati blog directory. Even though this isn’t a great way to find smaller blogs, it is one of the most effective ways to discover the big blogs in your niche should you decide to start guest blogging on big blogs.

Guest blogging is a numbers game so always aim to write good quality blog posts on 10 great blogs rather than on 50 lower authority blogs.

Approaching Blog Owners

Once you have found the blog you want to write for there are some basic steps you have to take to make sure your request is noticed:

  1. Read the Guidelines: it may sound obvious but big blog owners are busy people so make sure you follow their submission requirements.
  2. Get to know them: read their previous articles and guest articles, comment on the website and join in the conversation, follow them on Twitter – play to their ego
  3. Make it easy for them: most of the time I send an email with the blog post in a .txt notepad file with my copyright free images attached. I use a .txt file so that the html stays intact and my links are exactly how I want them.

Writing Great Guest Blog Posts

After all the work you have put in so far you want to make sure that your guest blog is accepted and published on the site you are targeting. So I guess the following tips will help you to make sure you write a great post:

Research -  use as many tools as you can to write a great article. Use Google Insights, Blog Comments, popular blog posts on other websites, Yahoo Answers etc. to research your topic. Try to find out what questions people are asking. I always find it is better to write an article that people want rather than just to throw up an article that “I think” they want!

Headline – make sure your headline is catchy and clearly describes your article. Remember you want people to read your guest post so be sure to spend some time thinking of great ideas.

Write your best content – This goes without saying, take your time and put some effort in to making the blog post look great and read well. Stay on topic and don’t waffle.

Images and sub headers – Split up your article with headings and images

Word Count – not too short and not too long… I have found that most people want to read a guest post around 600-1200 words.

Proofread – I can’t stress this enough; make sure you take the time to read and re-read your guest blog post for silly spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. At the end of the day you don’t want your work to be rejected after you’ve spent hours researching, writing and flirting befriending the blog owner.

What to Do If You Get Rejected

You have to accept now that you will get rejected. But don’t feel bad, move on some bloggers may give you a reason others may not. The main thing to do is keep trying and learning. I would urge that you don’t keep pestering the blogger if you are rejected and take any feedback they give you on board.

Go and Take Action

Now that you have read this article I want you to identify some key blogs in your business area and write some great guest blogs for your website. I hope this guide has been useful and please leave some comments below to share your thoughts and experiences of guest blogging.

I would also be grateful if you could share this article with your friends too :)

+Chris Dyson